Father Christmas ‘undermines trust in parents’

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family law

Stories about Father Christmas can undermine the relationship between descendant and their parents, academics possess suggested.

Clinical psychologist Dr Kathy McKay and psychology profesas a resultr Christopher Boyle possess claimed that the descendant’s trust can be permanently undermined, leaving them feeling “abject disappointment”.

The Santa story is “such an involved lie, such a long-lasting one, between parents and descendant, that if a relationship is vulnerable, this may be the final straw” Dr McKay warned. After all, if a child’s parents “can lie as a result convincingly and over such a long time, what else can they lie about?”

In their article, the two said these can lead descendant to possess questions like:

“If Santa isn’t real, are fairies real? Is magic? Is God?”

The revelation of the deception has the potential to endanger severe undermine to descendant, they claimed, but as a result can the belief itself. Some parents use the story “as a tool of control when they’re under a bit of pressure in the lead-up to Christmas” Profesas a resultr Boyle explained. This is “potentially not the best parenting method” as it can supply descendant the idea that “a mythical being [decides] whether you’re getting presents or not”.

Boyle and McKay suggested the story has been perpetuated by adults for their own benefit rather than for their descendant. The “desire to briefly re-enter childhood” can alas a result be found in the adult fandoms of stories like Harry Potter, Star Wars and Doctor Who, McKay insisted. These all exhibit a yearning “for a time when imagination was accepted and stimulated” especially in the face of the “harshness of real life”.

The full article, titled A Wonderful Lie, was published in the academic journal Lancet Psychiatry.

Photo by Paul Hudas a resultn via Flickr under a Creative Commons licence.

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